What do I need to mount NHT Speakers?

If I have older NHT speakers will the newer models sonically match?

MySW10ii / SW12 subwoofer has a loud hum what I turn it on. What can I do to get rid of the hum?

What do I need to build a home theatre system?

What type of receiver or amplifier works best for a home theatre?

Does NHT have any speaker placement tips?

How should I set my subwoofer to achieve a smooth home theatre sound?

What are the differences in surround formats?

What are differences between DVD, DVD-Audio and SACD?

What is amplifier clipping distortion?

Does NHT have a guide to room acoustics and loudspeaker placement?

What speaker wire gauge should I use?

What types of speakers are best for the rears -- dipolar, or more standard front-radiating models?

Why are some NHT speakers sealed while others are vented?

Do I need two subwoofers?

Does NHT have a glossary of terms?

Where can I get a manual for my older NHT Products?

What happened to the Forums and online Tech Help section?

How do I get warranty service for my new NHT Speakers?

Where can I find an authorized NHT repair center in my area?


What do I need to mount NHT Speakers?

The following Omni Mount Systems brackets should be used for wall mounting the following NHT Super Audio series loudspeakers.

Super Zero or SB1                  RST 25 or RST 25-UMK or Series 10

Super One or SB2                  ST-MP 50 or 53 RST-UMK or Series 20

SB3                                         ST-MP 50 or 53 RST-UMK or Series 20

The RST 25 comes with all of the necessary hardware to mount the bracket to the SB1. The RST 25-UMK comes with a flat metal plate to mount the bracket to the speaker. This plate needs to be removed to mount the stud to the SB1.

The ST-MP 50 requires the user to purchase the correct hardware. For both the SB2 and SB3, two 1/4"-20 x 5/8" pan head machine screws per loudspeaker are required. If 5/8" long screws are not available, 1/4" long screws may be substituted. However, the user needs to make sure that the screw is not bottoming in the threaded insert before the bracket is clamped to the loudspeaker. The 53 RST-UMK can be used in place of the ST-MP 50. It will however take a different length machine screw than the ST-MP 50. The 53 RST-UMK needs two 1/4"-20 x 1/4" pan head machine screws per loudspeaker.

The proper way to determine the length of these screws is to measure from the very end of the screw to the underneath of the screw head.

Omnimount makes speaker mounts for most of NHT Speakers. Go here to view mounts for NHT Speakers: http://www.omnimount.com/products/speaker_mounts_and_stands/speaker_mounts/

Omnimount does not sell direct, but they have a dealer locator here: Pricing may vary from dealer to dealer. http://www.omnimount.com/where_to_buy/

Click here for M5 and M6 Omnimount placement and mounting instructions


If I have older NHT speakers will the newer models sonically match?

There is more to sonic matching than just the make-up of the components... room size... placement… frequency response... imaging... cabinet design... and power handling can also play a role in the matching game. We have seen some unlikely mismatched speakers perform well together due to placement, and room acoustics... obviously left and right speakers should be perfectly matched, but sometimes different speakers in the rear / center work even though they don't sonically (component for component) match up. The only true way to find a good match is to listen to how they sound together.


My SW10ii / SW12 subwoofer has a loud hum what I turn it on. What can I do to get rid of the hum?

The DSS system and all cable TV systems have a ground wire connected to the shield of the signal on the outside of the house and driven into the earth with a metal rod or water pipe. The SW10II/12 is grounded to the power outlet through the third prong of the power cord. The AC wiring in the building has the ground conductor connected to a metal rod or water pipe outside the building. Once a patch cord is connected between the DSS system and the subwoofer, a complete circuit is formed called a ground loop. Current flowing in the ground loop can cause very large amounts of noise in the system. To legally install cable TV or a DSS system, there must be a ground conductor from the dish or cable tied to the earth outside of the building. This guarantees that if struck by lightening, the current will flow to ground (earth) outside of the building, never endangering someone's life inside or damaging any equipment. Removing the ground from the DSS or cable system is not a legal or moral option. We use a grounded power cord on our powered subwoofers and amplifiers to ensure that the customer is always safe. If there is ever any internal short in the subwoofer amplifier between the power supply and the chassis, the current will be shunted to ground (earth) through the power cord and the fuse will blow. The customer will never be in any danger of electric shock. The proper way to break the ground loop in the system is to do it at the signal level. This should be done at the output of the device that is causing the ground loop. In this case it is the DSS or cable system. The best way to do this is with a ground loop isolator. A good one is available from Jensen Transformers. Jensen Transformers, Inc., 7135 Hayvenhurst Ave. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Voice: (818) 374-5857 Fax: (818) 374-5856 www.jensen-transformers.com - VRD-1FF Retail cost of $59.95


What do I need to build a home theatre system?

Good basic audio and video components go without saying. In addition: a television, generally 27" or larger, a hi-fi VCR, and/or a DVD Player, a home theater receiver, controller or preamp with a surround sound processor, and a speaker system with at least five speakers, at least one of which can produce deep bass.


What type of receiver or amplifier works best for a home theatre?

We at NHT don't specifically endorse any particular brand of electronics. We do recommend that you:

  • Choose a model with adequate power: 100 watts per channel minimum, and rated to drive 4 ohm loads.
  • Look for models which offer extra channels, inputs and outputs, to accommodate future developments, or hardware and/or software upgradeability; many models now do.
  • Watch for resilient, high quality input and output connectors for the changes you re likely to make; balanced locking connectors, five-way binding posts (as opposed to spring-loaded) speaker connectors, etc.
  • Research before buying: check magazines for reviews, talk to your friends, and above all, use your ears.

There is no government regulation concerning power output claims for multichannel home theater receivers. Consequently all of the manufacturers exaggerate the power output available from these receivers. The single best technique to determine how much power a given receiver can deliver to the loudspeaker is for the consumer to find a review that includes proper electrical testing. The second best technique is to compare the weights of different receivers. The heavier receiver is almost always going to put out more power than the lighter ones.


Does NHT have any speaker placement tips?

  1. Imagine yourself sitting in the center of a circle with the speakers all around you on the edge of the circle. This is the ideal setup, and means that all speakers will be equally distant from the listening position and at the same height, with tweeters at ear level.
  2. Start by placing the front three speakers equidistant from the listening position, then the rear speakers as well. If you can't get all five speakers equidistant, try to at least get them at the same height.
  3. If the front left and right speakers are towers, or are sitting on stands, place them at least a foot from the television or large furniture so that they can radiate sound without interference -- but again, try to keep them equidistant from the listening area.
  4. If the center channel speaker is above or below the level of the left and right speakers, aim the center channel speaker so that its tweeter points toward your head from your usual listening position.
  5. Position the rear channels at an angle of about 120 degrees (+/- 60 degrees from a line from the center). In other words, if you were sitting in the center of a clock, the rear speakers would be positioned at the 4 o'clock and 8 o'clock positions, angled directly at the center.
  6. If you prefer to have the rear channel speakers above ear level, tilt them down a little so that the tweeters are aimed to a point near you and other listeners' heads.
  7. If your room is such that your are sitting closer to the rear channel speakers than the front speakers, aim them towards each other, so that were you to imagine lines coming straight out from the tweeters, they would intersect either behind, or in front of, your listeners' heads. Aiming them in this way will help keep you from noticing their locations.
  8. When placing a subwoofer, first try putting it in a corner of the room. If the sub sounds too boomy, move it away from the corner along one of the walls until you reach a point where there is adequate bass but you aren't aware that it's coming from the subwoofer. This position will often be about one third of the way into the room along one of the walls.
  9. If you are still having trouble finding a good place for the sub, try swapping places with it. Put the sub at the listening position, and play music or a movie with a lot of bass. Sit in various places until you find a location where the bass sounds smooth and even. Put the sub in that location. You've found the right location when there is plenty of bass but you aren't aware that it's coming from the subwoofer.
  10. Run the low pass filter to the sub at the lowest practical frequency. Ideally, the sub will only be used to produce the bottom two octaves (about 20-80 Hz) of the music or movie signal.
  11. If you are using two subs, don't set them up symmetrically. An asymmetric set up will prevent them from activating resonant modes in the room which would make the bass sound boomy and uneven.
  12. For 6.1 or 7.1 systems, refer to your processor or receiver manual to set up additional satellites beyond the first five. This is especially important for 7.1 systems, because there is no standard for speaker placement.

How should I set my subwoofer to achieve a smooth home theatre sound?

If you've set your main speakers to "small," begin by setting the subwoofer low pass filter -- which is available on either your surround processor or receiver, your subwoofer, or both -- right at your main speakers low frequency cutoff, which is typically 80 Hz. Next, adjust the low pass filter up and down in 10 Hz increments (or the increments available) until you achieve a good blend between the sub and the main speakers; ie, the satellites. If you've set your main speakers to "large,"match the low pass frequency of the sub to the lower frequency cutoff of the speaker (for example, 50 Hz) to start. Then move up and down in 10 Hz increments, or the increments available, until the speaker and sub blend well. While adjusting the low pass filter, vary the position of the subwoofer phase control. Choose the phase setting which produces the most bass at your usual listening position. Two more tips: first, using two channel music is usually the best way to integrate a subwoofer. When it's difficult to tell that you are listening to a 3 piece system, you've found the correct settings for your subwoofer because you'll also get smooth sound when you turn on your other channels and speakers. Second, take it easy with the volume control. Most people initially set the volume level on the sub too high to allow for truly smooth integration. NHT subwoofer owners manuals also offer extensive sections concerning subwoofer / satellite blending.


What are the differences in surround formats?

Dolby Pro Logic

The surround sound format that first popularized home theater was Dolby Pro Logic. This format appeared in the late eighties, and was the first to simulate the large theater experience in the living room. All the recordings we already owned could be played on the Dolby Pro Logic system, as it was backward compatible, able to reproduce both two channel audio and also (using its built-indecoder) "unfold" surround and center channel signals embedded in the newer multi channel recordings. Unlike more recent formats, Dolby Pro Logic was not digital. It was, however, the transitional format between two channel stereo and the multi channel discrete audio that we have today.

Dolby Digital (AC-3)

Dolby Digital, the next significant developmentin home theater sound, is designed as a digital system that keeps the material for each channel fully discrete. Dolby Digital also adds a new feature to multi channel sound. Along with offering full-range and completely discrete left, center, right, left surround and right surround channels, Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtracks provide a sixth ".1" channel, of limited bandwidth. This new channel delivers low frequency effects, such as those bass rumbles and booms we not only hear but also feel in a well equipped cinema. And because the Dolby Digital system allows theater surround soundtracks to be transferred into the home, it has proven a popular format for storing, distributing and transmitting 5.1-channel soundtracks via digital media such as DVD, digital cable, digital broadcast TV and satellite transmissions. It is, at this time, the most universally accepted standard for 5.1 channel mixing and playback.

DTS

A competing format to Dolby Digital is DTS Digital Surround, or "DTS". Like Dolby Digital, DTS is a 5.1-channel surround sound format available both in movie theaters and as an optional soundtrack on some home DVD-Videomovies. While not used in HDTV or digital satellite broadcasting, the DTS format is becoming more common on DVD's. The primary advantage of DTS is that it uses less data compression than Dolby Digital. Because of this, many leading home theater enthusiasts experience DTS as surpassing Dolby Digital in sound quality.

Dolby Pro Logic II

A relatively recent market entry, Dolby Pro LogicII} { is an advanced digital matrix decoding systemthat can deriannel surround (Left, Center, Right, Left Surround, and Right Surround) from any program material, from two to 5.1 channel, whether or not it has been ProLogic encoded. On Pro Logic encoded material such as movie soundtracks, the sound is like that of Dolby Digital 5.1. On un-encoded material such as FM broadcasts, PL II offers surround output, which creates the effect of a fuller, more involving soundstage. Among other improvements over the original Pro Logic, Pro Logic II provides two separate full-range surround channels, as opposed to Pro Logic's single, limited-bandwidth channel.

Surround formats beyond 5.1

Some newer AV receivers, system controllers and surround processors have followed in the recent footsteps of movie theaters, and begun to offer more than 5.1 discrete channels. The benefit of a larger number of discrete channels and speakers is to offer an even deeper sense of the entire soundfield. These new enhanced formats are generally referred to by the number of channels plus the .1 Low Frequency Effects (LFE) channel, and so are known as 6.1 and 7.1. The differe nce is in the number of surround channels offered: two in 5.1, three in6.1 and four in a 7.1.


What are differences between DVD, DVD-Audio and SACD?

Most of us associate the name DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) with DVD-Video, a primarily visual medium which offers twice the visual resolution of VHS, accompanied by stereo and multi-channel surround soundtracks in such formats as Dolby Digital or DTS. DVD-Audio is a more recent format specifically designed to provide the highest audio fidelity achievable on DVD. Its audio resolution exceeds that of both DVD-Video and conventional CD, and it can also offer text and still images. You must have a DVD player capable of playing DVD-A discs. These tend to be a bit more expensive than a regular DVD video player. SACD, or Super Audio Compact Disc, is a format jointly developed by Sony and Philips. It's also a higher resolution audio format, which can accommodate text and images. Like DVD-A, SACD's hold more information than regular CD's -- up to six times the data -- and thus offer as many as six channels of audio. Again you need a DVD player capable of playing SACD formatted discs.


What is amplifier clipping distortion?

Clipping is a type of distortion that degrades an audio signal when an amplifier has reached the limit of its power output. It is typically caused by overdriving an amplifier. The physics of clipping is simple: when a signal pushes an amplifier beyond its limit, the circuit attempts to handle the demand by roughly clipping off the tops and bottoms of the waveforms, producing a distorted version of the signal that has a higher proportion of high frequency energy than the original signal had. High frequency energy, of course, gets routed straight to the tweeters, which have small voice coils and can't handle as much power as larger Woofer voice coils -- and therefore easily burn out under the ongoing assault. Tweeter drivers, too, undergo heat build-up, which eventually destroys them. There are three methods by which to avoid clipping. One is to keep the volume level reasonable, and listen for distortion. The second is to use a high power amplifier that can handle bursts of signal without clipping the waveforms. And the third is to use high quality amplifiers that have built-in limiters that rarely allow amplifiers to clip. This is particularly useful in subwoofer applications where amplifier clipping is less audible and the possibility for clipping is higher. The NHT Evolution A1, for example, offers such a limiter.


Does NHT have a guide to room acoustics and loudspeaker placement?

NHT does not currently have a guide to room acoustics and loudspeaker placement. Please refer to our speaker placement tips section here.


What speaker wire gauge should I use?

The ideal size or gauge of your speaker wire depends on the length of run between your power amplifier and speakers. In general, we recommend that you use a high quality multi-strand copper wire. For runs less than ten feet 14 gage wire is adequate; for runs greater than ten feet, 12-gage wire is best. Why increase wire diameter over longer runs? Because smaller wire has more resistance per foot -- which impedes the flow of current -- than larger diameter wire, and if resistance is high enough it will alter sound quality. Given the run lengths above, either 14 or 12 gage is sufficiently low in resistance that you will encounter no degradation in sound.


What types of speakers are best for the rears -- dipolar, or more standard front-radiating models?

Dipolar speakers were popular with early Dolby Pro Logic systems, since they did a good job of making the rear speaker mono signal sound bigger and wider. They're no longer necessary, in our opinion, with the kinds of discrete signals distributed to each speaker in DTS and Dolby Digital systems, because the sense of spaciousness is right in the mix itself. Therefore our recommendation for more modern discrete systems is to use standard direct-radiating speakers.


Why are some NHT speakers sealed while others are vented?

Different design goals result in different types of speaker systems. Vented cabinets play louder with less power, but offer less accurate bass performance. They tend to be boomier, more monotone and sound less natural than sealed systems. Sealed speaker systems, while less efficient, usually offer greater low frequency extension and higher reproduction accuracy, resulting in a more natural, musical sound. We prefer that.


Do I need two subwoofers?

The short answer: maybe. Low frequencies have long wavelengths that interact with room boundaries (walls, floors and ceilings) in such a way as to produce standing waves, which pile up or "stand" at various places in a room. If you walk around a room while playing music with low frequencies, you'll notice that in some places (such as near walls) the bass is very loud, while in others (such as the middle of the room) it is far more quiet . These peaks and dips in loudness are the result of standing waves. By using two subwoofers, and placing them carefully, you can use one to fill in where the other is quiet, and vice versa. There's also a subtle sonic advantage in using stereo subwoofers. Humans locate the origins of low frequency sounds by sensing differences between when they arrive at the ears. When using a single subwoofer driven by an LFE output, these differences in arrival times are lost. So by keeping the signal arrival time cues intact, stereo subwoofers can add to our sense of a realistic experience, especially when listening to soundtracks.


Does NHT have a glossary of terms?

There is no NHT glossary of terms at this time.


Where can I get a manual for my older NHT Products?

Manuals for a good number of our products can be found here. Instructions for products that are older or missing can be obtained verbally via telephone or e-mail at 800-648-9993 or help@nhthifi.com


What happened to the Forums and online Tech Help section?

NHT was using help desk software provided by Rockford Corporation. We have since taken over all of our websites in-house and no longer use Rockfords web servers. The forums and tech section were nice features, but required extra man-power to manage them. In order to serve our customers in a timely fashion we have developed a parts and repair process that will streamline support to the appropriate department. If you have questions or need additional service please call NHT Customer Service at: 800.648.9993 or email support@nhthifi.com.


How do I get warranty service for my new NHT Speakers?

Your original purchase receipt is all you need for warranty repair. As long as you purchased through an authorized NHT dealer and it is still within the warranty period, we will cover your repair. Be aware that any purchases made on E-Bay or via the Internet (other than these NHT authorized Internet dealers) will not be covered under the NHT manufacturer warranty. Be sure the dealer you are buying from is authorized by NHT before making a purchase. Call our customer service department at: 00.648.9993 or email support@nhthifi.com if you are unsure.


Where can I find an authorized NHT repair center in my area?

All U.S. repairs must be sent to NHT for service. We used to work with outside repair stations across the U.S., but found it was hard to manage the quality control. It may cost a bit more to send your speaker back to us in California, but you can be assured it will be checked out thoroughly by an NHT technician, and repaired properly. We stand by all repairs done at NHT. If you are in Canada, please look at our authorized repair center page for all Canadian customers.